Private

Hugh Elmar Sibbald

Conflict: 
WW1
Additional Information: 

Son of Thomas Speed and Louisa Sibbald, of 20, William St., Redcliffs, Christchurch, New Zealand. Native of Otago, New Zealand.

References:
  • CWGC
NZ WAR GRAVES
CONTRIBUTED

Public Contributions:

Submitted by: Sophie Sibbald
Relationship to casualty: Unknown
WAR EXPERIENCES REPORT Hugh Elmar Sibbald travelled from Dunedin, New Zealand to Brisbane, Australia and joined the Australian infantry on 9 Sept 1914. The 9th Battalion was raised within weeks of t... Read More
WAR EXPERIENCES REPORT Hugh Elmar Sibbald travelled from Dunedin, New Zealand to Brisbane, Australia and joined the Australian infantry on 9 Sept 1914. The 9th Battalion was raised within weeks of the declaration of war. It was the first battalion recruited in Queensland, and with the 10th, 11th and 12th Battalions it formed the 3rd Brigade. After some basic training in Brisbane, the battalion was deployed to Egypt arriving in early December 1914. They were assigned to complete intense training before they embarked for Gallipoli. The 3rd Brigade was first to arrive at Gallipoli at around 4.30am on the 25th April 1915. Pte. Sibbald was heavily involved in establishing and defending the front line of the ANZAC beach head. He participated in many tragic battles including the Landing of Gallipoli, Lone Pine and The Nek. After the withdrawal from Gallipoli, the battalion returned to Egypt. Pte. Sibbald went to hospital sick with an undocumented disease. Four weeks later, Hugh Sibbald was released out of hospital. The 9th Battalion was split to help form the 49th Battalion and further reinforcements strengthened it. The battalion became part of the 13th Brigade of the 4th Australian Division. Hugh Sibbald was transferred to the 49th Battalion. Pte. Sibbald was then promoted to Lance Corporal for his achievements at Gallipoli. After forming at Tel-el-Kebir, Egypt the battalion undertook a period of training in the desert until early June 1916. They sailed on the Arcadian to Marseilles, France, on 12 June 1916. On the boat LCpl. Sibbald got pleuropneumonia. He was sent to hospital two days after landing in France. After 26 days in hospital, LCpl Sibbald was moved into the trenches on the Western Front to join his Battalion. The new battalion's first significant major battle was at Mouquet Farm, particularly the assault launched on 3 September 1916. Hugh Elmar Sibbald suffered gun shot wounds on his hands and face. He was admmitted to hospital 2 days later and then transferred to a hospital in Edmonton, England. Whilst he was in hospital, he was recorded absent without leave. This resulted in a demotion to private. The day he got out of hospital is unknown. Early in 1917, the battalion participated in the advance that followed the German retreat to the Hindenburg Line. Later in the year, the battalion moved to Ypres, Belgium. There, they fought in the battle of Messines on 9 June 1917 and the battle of Polygon Wood on 26 September 1917. The 49th battalion saw out the rest of the year alternating between front-line duty, and training in England. With the collapse of Russia in October 1917, a major German offensive on the Western Front was expected in early 1918. The Germans were able to transfer large amounts of equipment from the Eastern Front to the Western Front. They launched their Spring Offensive in March. The 4th Division moved to defend positions around Dernancourt on the River Ancre. The 49th Battalion participated in a large German attack on 5 April 1918, where “(the 4th Division) faced the strongest attack mounted against Australians during the war”. [Coulthard-Clark, 1998] They lost 14 officers and 207 other ranks. Pte. Sibbald experienced gun shot wounds in the chest. He was admitted to the field hospital and then transferred to Camiers, France. He died of wounds in hospital on the 25th April, 20 days after the attack.


Personal Tributes:

Casualty

Service Number: 
748
Name:
Hugh Elmar Sibbald
Rank: 
Private
Date of Birth:
Not known
Date of Enlistment:
Not known
Armed Force: 
Army
Unit:
AIF, Australian Infantry, 49 Battalion

Casualty Details

Cause of Death:
Died of wounds
Date of Death:
25 April 1918
Day of Death:
Thursday
Age at Death: 
35
Conflict: 
WW1

Embarkation Details

Text in italics supplied by Cenotaph Online, Auckland War Memorial Museum

Cemetery

Cemetery Reference: 
XXXII. D. 8A.
Cemetery Location: 
France
Hugh Elmar Sibbald
Images
More information
  • Files must be less than 100 MB.
  • Allowed file types: png gif jpg jpeg.
Files
More information
  • Files must be less than 100 MB.
  • Allowed file types: txt pdf doc.